Proper storage of vegetables and fruit can not only prolong their usefulness but it can save the flavor. We spend way too much on our fresh produce to them go to waste. These charts will save you money.

 

 

Storing Fresh Produce for Best Flavor

Store in the refrigerator

Fruit

Vegetables

Apples (more than 7 days) Artichokes Cauliflower Peas
Apricots Asparagus Celery
Asian Pears Green beans Cut Vegetables
Berries Beets Green Onions
Cherries Belgian Endive Herbs (not Basil)
Cut Fruit Broccoli Leafy Vegetables
Figs Brussels Sprouts Leeks
Grapes Cabbage Lettuce
Carrots Mushrooms
  1. Place fruits and vegetables in separate, perforated plastic bags
  2. Use within 1-3 days for maximum flavor and freshness.
  3. Store each group in different produce drawers in the refrigerator to minimize the detrimental effects of ethylene produced by fruits on your other produce.

Ripen on the counter first, then refrigerate

Avocados
Kiwi
Nectarines
Peaches
Pears
Plums
Plumcots
  1. To prevent moisture loss, store fruits and vegetables separately in a paper bag, perforated plastic bag, or ripening bowl on the counter away from sunlight. Ripening fruit in a bowl or paper bag can be enhanced by placing an apple with the fruit to be ripened.
  2. After ripening, store in refrigerator and use within 1-3 days. 

Store only at room temperature

Fruit

Vegetables

Apples (fewer than 7 days) Plantains Basil (in water) Potatoes
Bananas Pomegranates Cucumber Pumpkins
Citrus Fruits Eggplant Sweet Potatoes
Mangoes Garlic
Melons Ginger
Papayas Jimaca
Persimmons Onions
Pinapple Peppers
  1. Some produce should only be stored at room temperatures. Refrigeration can cause cold damage or prevent them from ripening to a good flavor and texture. For example, pink tomatoes ripen to a better taste and red color if they are left at room temperature. In the refrigerator, they do not turn red and even red tomatoes kept in the refrigerator lose their flavor.
  2. Keep away from direct sunlight.